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Apr 25, 2022Liked by Brad Weed

I appreciate the modesty in noting that the problems of affluent communities are not equivalent to those that impact the existence and rights of Indigenous and Black communities.... They do share features however, about rights and formal or informal privileges. In the interests of adding to the conversation, we have found that the legibility of maps depends on the carto-literacy of the reader.

Our next door neighbor's property line is only two or three feet from our house. Dividing our two houses is a driveway which our deed shows has an easement. When we moved in seven years ago the elderly next door neighbor was very assiduous in showing me where the property line was lest we think the driveway was "ours." What he wanted to convey was that we could park in the driveway but could we please park as close to our property line as possible to afford him the ability to move back and forth from his backyard to his front.

A year ago the property was sold and the new owners moved in. We were concerned that they might not understand the purpose and durability of formal easements and we were right to be, but not for the reasons we anticipated. Rather than seek to impinge our pass and repass rights up and down the driveway they have "mis-read" the easement and think that the driveway is ours and seek our permission to use it.

Our question now is, more in jest than seriousness, are we to assume its maintenance (moss removal), or upkeep because the neighbors seem to believe that the property line is 2 or 3 feet from their house!

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Thanks for commenting, Seth! I appreciate it. ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿผ

Yes, you're spot on about carto-literacy. That was the argument Samuel Boggs made in his Cartohypnosis paper. https://www.jstor.org/stable/19200

During the Boggs era, however, literacy was really about better understanding what a border means in the context of certain brand politics...this is mine OR this is yours, but it's is not 'ours'. But as you point out, and illustrated in these examples from Latin America, it's not so black and white.

A more accurate carto-literacy, in many cases, needs to include a more nuanced and flexible interpretation where a certain piece of land is yours AND mine. These 'radical cartographers' believe just the act of drawing and discussing goals, usage, and histories can lead to a shared literacy in the context of use. Maybe it's time you sit down and draw a map with your neighbor! Don't forget to bring some green watercolors to illustrate moss growth. It's their space too! ๐Ÿ˜

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Apr 16, 2022Liked by Brad Weed

Brilliantly researched and compiled Brad. I learn so much from your podcasts while I'm cooking my dinner!

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Thank you, Carol. Warms my heart to know my work made a difference for you. I too am learning a lot and I'm thrilled to be able to share with others! Bon appรฉtit! ๐Ÿฝ

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